Respond to 2 classmate posts in Business Innovation Course NO PLAGIARISM

Business Finance

PLEASE DO NOT JUST SAY “GOOD POST”, “GOOD POINT”, YOU MUST TALK ABOUT AND GO IN DEPTH ABOUT THE CONTENT AND INFORMATION ABOUT THE POST.

AT LEAST 150 WORDS EACH RESPONSE AND PLEASE SEPARATE EACH RESPONSE

POST 1:

Hello Everyone,

The president and co-founder of Pixar, Ed Catmull talked about three organizational principles at Pixar that support a workplace environment where employees can implement creative solutions to problems. The principles which he created are that all employees have the freedom to communicate with anyone, the environment must be safe for everyone to offer their idea, and they must stay close to innovations which are taking place in the academic community (Catmull 2008). Catmull 2008 was forthcoming when he stated, “what we can do is construct an environment that nurtures trusting and respectful relationships and unleashes everyone’s creativity” (p. 65). It was crucial to the organization of Pixar to adopt practices that promote creativity and innovation within the organization.

Communication is everywhere and it is not as straightforward and effortless as we may believe. Employees need to feel they can speak honestly and openly in order to foster creativity. As a manager you do not want for your employees to be concerned about offending someone, getting into a conflict, or being concerned they are going to steps on a senior colleague’s ego. Instituting a principle of open architecture communication amongst your team and within the organization will break down the possible barriers to free up communication. Encouraging a safe environment for employees to speak up and give their honest feedback and opinion will improve creativity and the implementation of creative solutions.

In my current organization, there has been a recent turn over in staff. Therefore, allowing those who remain and new employees to share their opinions, ideas, and feel as if they have a voice is imperative to creativity, motivation, and retention. The organization is small and our staff needs to be included in decisions. Often times our staff have many responsibilities which interact with various departments. Because they are so experienced with each department, they have a unique opportunity to have constructive and creative input with regards to various areas. It is imperative that the staff feel they can speak up as equals and give their honest feedback and suggestions. They should also be encouraged to do so. As a leader, it is essential to listen to feedback and suggestions even if you do not agree with it.

Organizations can benefit from encouraging managers to hire great employees and empower those employees to take risks, share their ideas, and allow them to follow their creative appetites. This work culture drives more enjoyment and fulfillment at work, fosters respect, open communication and leads to great outcomes. Currently, in my organization there are barriers and staff are at times concerned about speaking up.

As a manager I would encourage all departments to hold regular weekly team meetings and have huddles each morning. I would ensure the staff is aware that their opinion matters and that there is an open door policy which fosters a culture of open opinion solicitation. In order to have the staff feel as though it is a learning atmosphere and where creative solutions are valued, I would recommend an off-site team team building day which would encompass exercises where trust is necessary. Empowering staff is critical and it will have a positive impact on the employees to be more relaxed, which is best for creative minds to work and brainstorm together. This ultimately starts when there is trust amongst the team (Howitt & McManus 2012). As Catmull 2008 has recommended, “everyone is encouraged to comment…there are several benefits…they become more creative…communicate important points to the entire crew at the same time…people learn from and inspire each other” (p. 70).

Jennifer

References:

Catmull, E. (2008). How Pixar fosters collective creativity. Harvard Business Review, 86(9), 64-72. Retrieved from https://cb/hbsp/harvard.edu/cbmp/pl/66107934/66107944/2a6d12f31329839c093ff40db3f03366

Howitt, M., & McManus, J. (2012). Stakeholder management: An instrument for decision making. Management Services, 56(3), 9-34.

POST 2:

In this course, we have been talking a lot about what “creativity” really means. And to most people, if you ask them to think of a “creative company” then organizations like Pixar and Disney might come to mind first. But as the article this week shows, creativity is more than just creating art. It can be used in the structure and the operations of an organization as well (Catmull, 2008). This should be no surprise to any of you, as this has been a main theme of this course. But the article is really great in that it gives very specific ideas about how to make your organization creative on the inside. The introductory page of the article lists five “principles for managing your creative organization”

  • “Empower your creatives…
  • Create a peer culture…
  • Free up communication…
  • Craft a learning environment…
  • Get more out of post-mortems” (Catmull, 2008)

One of my favorite Steve Jobs quotes is from over a decade ago, in which he was describing the newly released iPod for an interview in the NY Times, “Most people make the mistake of thinking design is what it looks like. That’s not what we think design is. It’s not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” (Walker, 2003) You can replace “design” with “creativity” and the saying still holds true. Creativity isn’t just about what something looks and feels like. Creativity is seen in how it works. And this is true for organizations as well. Pixar is not a creative company because they create art that looks and feels great. They are creative because they know how to work together, as evidenced by the five principles above.

References

Catmull, E. (2008). How Pixar fosters collective creativity. Harvard Business Review, 86(9), 64–72.

Walker, Rob (Nov 30, 2003). The Guts of a New Machine. Retrieved Mar 24, 2015 from http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/30/magazine/the-guts-of-a-new-machine.html.

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